Water Summit

The summit will focus public attention on the serious challenges facing Minnesota’s water supplies – in both rural and urban areas of the state – and continue statewide dialogue around steps that must be taken to address those challenges. It will bring together water quality experts, farmers, legislators, regulators, the business community, members of the public, local leaders, and a wide variety of other stakeholders.

Water Summit

Submitted by (@trussell)

Establish a State Perennial Ethanol Standard - 50% by 2026

Today, about a third of Minnesota's corn goes exclusively to ethanol production. That's no accident - its driven by policy (Federal Renewable Fuel Standard). New technology now allows us to make ethanol from other crops, including perennial crops like native grasses that are great for water, soil health, climate and habitat. I propose that we modify our existing fuel standards to require that at least 50% of ethanol blended ...more »

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Water Summit

Submitted by (@kuchenma)

Perennial cover is key!

Minnesota made an important step in the right direction by passing buffer legislation last year. But in order to ensure clean water for future generations we need to do much more. Our ultimate goal should be to have no less than ten percent of the land in each of Minnesota's watersheds in perennial cover. Research confirms that planting small strips of native prairie on agricultural land protects water quality by dramatically ...more »

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Submitted by (@markhayes)

Living cover

The idea of living cover is not new but what species to use is a very short list indeed. Alfalfa is the most desirable because of the deep roots that tend to store water and shrink in dry periods, this allows water to penetrate up to 8 feet even in clay quickly until the roots swell from the water uptake. In the clay country of Wright County the constant corn / bean rotation has resulted in extreme erosion and hard ...more »

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Submitted by (@shanechaput)

Ice fishing regulations

I have lived on lake Mille Lacs for the past 19 years. As an avid ice fisherman I have witnessed first hand the pollution left behind at the end of the ice fishing season. Minnesota regulates camp grounds the other seasons of the year but has no regulation over fish house "camp grounds" during ice fishing. Nothing to mandate garbage pick up, toilet facilities or the basic rules to regulate what's needed if your fish house ...more »

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Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

Don't Pass It On.

Iowa shouldn't receive our water problems, nor should those south to the Gulf "Dead Zone." I'm not sure it's possible in all communities, but an effort to test, control, and remove contaminants or nutrients at checkpoints, would keep moving waters from moving problems. They'd also provide irrigation resources for El Nino drought years ahead. Managed-use could mean a bumper crop in Minnesota, regardless of rainfall fluctuations. ...more »

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Water Summit

Submitted by (@vedakanitz)

Area of Critical Concern

WHEREAS, the Mississippi River and downstream portions of its tributaries south of the Twin Cities area are managed by a fragmented collection of local, county, state, and federal authorities; and, WHEREAS, these authorities do not provide consistent, coordinated protection and management of the river system's cultural, economic and ecological resources; and, WHEREAS, the river's communities and ecosystems urgently need ...more »

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Submitted by (@markhayes)

Sustaining Our Water Supplies

We do not know what are ground water resources are doing in real time and it has to do with state agencies that will not keep employees current in technology. There is a bigger problem, That problem is that the DNR will not accept historical data. The U of M published for many decades water resource technical bulletins. In these bulletins are data of static water levels in the 40', 50' and 60's and even before but ...more »

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Submitted by (@lovemywildlife)

Engage smaller 10-25 acre properties that don't qualify for farm programs.

There are many smaller parcels, where maybe the homestead and some marginal farm acres were sold off that are not eligible for any conservation programs, yet could play a larger role in the solution as they are scattered around everywhere, and typically do consist of marginal lands. Perennial plantings or prairie restoration and tree cover could help with both wind and water erosion, and the homeowner could get some help ...more »

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Submitted by (@erik.dahl)

Aquatic Invasive Species

The spread of AIS through our lakes and rivers has a devastating impact on natural aquatic life. Stopping it will require behavioral changes and adequate penalties for offenders. Infested waters need ongoing research and the best available technology to clean them up. In this session, we will define what is currently being done to address the aquatic invasive species issues and ask for participants suggestions for moving ...more »

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Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

3G Cellulosic ethanol production from buffer crops?

Chempolis (3G cellulosic ethanol technology: The Digest’s 2016 8-Slide Guide to Chempolis) is touted as a profitable alternative to food crop ethanol production. If this science has really advanced to a state, why can't we put corn subsidies on native plants in a buffer zone instead? It just makes sense.

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