Water Summit

The summit will focus public attention on the serious challenges facing Minnesota’s water supplies – in both rural and urban areas of the state – and continue statewide dialogue around steps that must be taken to address those challenges. It will bring together water quality experts, farmers, legislators, regulators, the business community, members of the public, local leaders, and a wide variety of other stakeholders.

Water Summit

Go to the source.

Short of a Depression-Era diversion project, there's just no stopping the power of the Mississippi, down South. But up on the farm, it's different. Pesticide and herbicide reformations are the hardest science to crack, and most expensive too, and perhaps hardest to treat medically. Identifying and targeting natural flood plain zones, and constructing restrictions and drainage diversions that will forever prevent field ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Water Summit

Return to Your Roots

It wasn't that long ago that we had many more farmers that diversified their crops. They understood the need to care for the land. It wasn't about "Bigger, Better, More...More...More" A mono-crop culture is not sustainable. SWMN is a desert of black dirt that blows around and nothing grows without chemicals. There is a huge difference between soil (living) and dirt (dead). All of the chemical applications that are ...more »

Submitted by (@pfurshong)

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Penalize municipalities for putting water in the wrong spot.

Cities (all cities including the MET Council) should be fined on a per gallon basis for the waters removed from an aquifer and not allowed to infiltrate back to those aquifers. These fines would go to a special fund with a sole purpose of replacing old WWTPs with ones that return the waters to their proper places. Starting with the poorest communities in the state and working up. Being for out state it would be nice ...more »

Submitted by (@markhayes)

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MN Does not want another Peru catastrophy

Clean-up Strategies, water sensors, water purifiers, etc.etc are economic stimulations for all the wrong reasons. We as a state have the ability to prevent what other states unfortunately didn't; such as polluted waters, contaminated land. Pro-active leadership and policies require Prevent Plans not only Post Fallout Plans. Just ask the people in Peru who currently are dealing with their Oil spill catastrophe. A Fallout ...more »

Submitted by (@locksleyproject)

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The costs for water pollution should be accounted for in the State's economic balance sheet.

The State of Minnesota measures economic success by a variety of metrics, Gross Domestic Product, gross sales, unemployment, tax reveue, etc., but we don't take into account the negative impacts and costs of water pollution. Ag-nutrients and pesticides, urban wastewater and stormwater treatments are counted as contributing to tje GDP, not subtracting the costs from our bottom line. Other costs like atmospheric deposition ...more »

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Develop business model for water quality protection.

It s easy to build a business that ignores water quality, or pollutes water, but we need to develop profitable ways to protect water quality. Businesses who specialize in pollution prevention could be highlighterd, promoted, given contracting priorities or incentives and make more money.

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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20% electricity from perennials by 2030

Making electricity from perennial crops (using switch grass or other crops co-fired with modern gas or coal facilities) is an equitable way to clean up water and improve habitat while ensuring profitability for farm operations.

Submitted by (@trussell)

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New School Curriculum- Understanding the Environment

Help students understand the consequences, both good and bad, of how we live, work, and play, and our impact on the environment. We not only have to fix our environmental problems, but we also have to teach people to make different choices. As I look around, kids know all about recycling, but they seem to know nothing about saving water, reducing the waste stream, and minimizing their carbon footprint. Education is the ...more »

Submitted by (@lovemywildlife)

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MEPA Laws need to be followed for pipelines and mining

The biggest challenge to Minnesota’s water is corporate hubris and greed, which threaten our water with toxic runoff and pipeline spills. With our current permitting system that seems to favor corporations, it’s no wonder most Minnesotans shrugged when they heard about Enbridge’s Sandpiper pipeline, figuring Enbridge would get its way and that there was no way we could stop it. Enbridge proposed a new pipeline route ...more »

Submitted by (@janethillnew)

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We need more attention to the Invading Carp crisis

Though much of the discussion here discusses the Pipeline issues, there is also the Asian Carp which is just as Important. I believe there needs to be more preventative action in this then the recent plan by the UofM which came up with noise and water jets to ward off the species. This is another example of wasted money for all involved.

Submitted by (@locksleyproject)

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University of Minnesota Extension Educators for Water Quality

The University of Minnesota currently has Extension Educators for Water Quality in a limited number of locations. Extension Educators should be deployed in all parts of the state to connect University research with local outreach and education. This should be at State expense, not at the expense of local government.

Submitted by (@jill.trescott)

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Water Traffic Control

Air traffic control we can understand, as the need for management and timing of aircraft at terminals is quite obvious. However, natural disasters of weather can brew several states away, when the Mississippi basin covers half of our nation. Natural flood plains absorb much water outside of towns and levees, but an active backflow management to a watershed network of holding reservoirs has been just too much for a busy ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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