Water Summit

The summit will focus public attention on the serious challenges facing Minnesota’s water supplies – in both rural and urban areas of the state – and continue statewide dialogue around steps that must be taken to address those challenges. It will bring together water quality experts, farmers, legislators, regulators, the business community, members of the public, local leaders, and a wide variety of other stakeholders.

Water Summit

Fix septic systems across the state

Failed and inefficient septic systems are a major source of water pollution in Minnesota. Inspection and upgrading is normally only required when property changes hands. Because they impact public waters, they should be inspected regularly and upgraded as needed. Septic system inspection should be mandatory and regular - not only when they are bought or sold.

Submitted by (@downing)

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Engage our Faith Communities More Aggressively

Our communities of faith have stood on the sidelines with this issue for too long. It is time we solicit our leaders in the the various faith communities to reinforce that which most every faith recognizes. That being that we all and that means everyone has a personal responsibility for the care of what we have been given. Water is life and people should have a certain sense of guilt kick in when abuses of that are ...more »

Submitted by (@sesparlin)

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Water Summit

Agricultural Drain Tile Must Be Tracked

We know that farmland drain tile funnels more water and pollutants into Minnesota's water bodies. Yet, no one is tracking - on a state-wide basis - the amount and location of drain tile projects. The Minnesota DNR must be adequately funded to determine the full extent of agricultural drain tiling in Minnesota.

Submitted by (@tcasey)

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Trees, Leaves, Lawns, and Lagoons

City trimming wastes are ideal for UMN Dr. Roger Ruan's microwave pyrolysis oil machinery, perhaps. But, the cities' water works' lime slurry lagoons are maybe a cheap way to make those products less acidic too? I'm not the scientist here, but it stands to reason that with all of this free stuff on-hand, injecting lime into the feedstock input or the oil vapor output, might just result in a neutral PH product line. Can ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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On-Farm Processing for Profits

Algae farming sounds nuts, but the science backs it up. Farm runoff contains the nutrients that grow pond and stream algae, and it keeps them. Funding incentives for farm ponds and ditches that collect algae, and for on-farm processes that cheaply harvest it into a coffee-like fertilizer makes sense. UMN's Brett Barney and Steve Heilmann have that science in-hand now. Clean water, on-farm fuel generation, water and pesticide ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Implement a public education and action encouragement plan for water, Minnesota's iconic asset

References to just the most iconic of MN's waters (Miss R, BWCA etc) are important, but water itself is MN's iconic asset. Gov. Dayton has wisely recognized that we are in deep trouble. Changes in human behavior clearly are required and are notoriously difficult to achieve. We need the Gov to continue his leadership on this by developing public education and action plans that encompass the entire field of problems ...more »

Submitted by (@johnpjames46)

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Solar Thermosyphon Water Transport

Solar disinfection and transportation pipes can pump needed water supplies to higher elevations. Strategically-placed passive solar pipeline heating would create a pumping action by convection, over hills and mountains, then down to a cooler shaded decline in elevation of ground or of a man-made well. With all ends below supply and destination pond levels always, the sunniest and driest states would experience drought ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Delta Dawn

Our share of responsibility for the Mississippi Delta "Dead Zone" may not be the largest, but as Americans we share in the sorrowful death of jobs, industry, and food lost in this mistake. But there's hope. Water is diverted to the Intercoastal Waterway via a shipping canal, and that barrier chain runs to Texas. Clean water to the Southwest is a real issue, and NASA expects it's getting worse in years to come. Algal ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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'Xceed'is the name of a bioreactor for industrial waters.

I don't know what metals that this device can remove from site waters, or where all it may be useful. But, if it can address the 1400 cities reporting lead contamination in drinking water supplies, as does Flint, I'm in favor of it.

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Subterranean Sinkhole Safety

Constructing tunnel labyrinth for the flow-processing of raw sewage wastewater below ground within the limestone and sandstone layers under the Twin Cities is a safe way of reinforcing those layers against collapsing into sinkholes. This is a major problem in areas of changing groundwater tables, especially given the size and weight of downtown buildings and water retention pools on the surface above. Natural water ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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conservation and water quality requirements for farm rental contracts.

A large percentage of Minnesota cropland is rented. Farmland owners should require water quality standards for farm contracts requiring farmers to reduce runoff, reduce nutrient loss and protect water quality with penalties for non-compliance. If landlords simply required Water Quality Certification lots more acres would protect our water.

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Priorization vs First Come First Served

Each River Basin in the State is a unique resource requiring a unique set of solutions. There are a multitude of solutions for every problem yet all solutions do provide the bang for the buck and others do. A more concerted effort to prioritize options that achieve multiple objectives and more efficient use of public and private resources is critical to success. Currently there is a lack of coordination between LSOHC; ...more »

Submitted by (@harnackcreek)

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