Water Summit

The summit will focus public attention on the serious challenges facing Minnesota’s water supplies – in both rural and urban areas of the state – and continue statewide dialogue around steps that must be taken to address those challenges. It will bring together water quality experts, farmers, legislators, regulators, the business community, members of the public, local leaders, and a wide variety of other stakeholders.

Campaign: Water Summit

Ban corn subsidies within buffer zone/ add it for native cellulose

If we remove corn crop subsidies within, say a hundred yards of buffer zone waterways, then replace those with cellulosic native plant feedstock subsidies, farmers would be foolish to plant more corn in a glutted commodities market. They might harvest entirely subsidized native crops. Underwriting costs of on-farm processing would boost rural employment too. It's the minimal input costs, not the selling price that makes ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Campaign: Water Summit

County and Township Road Conversion

The popular US Farm Report pointed-out that in the settlement days of yesteryear, when county and township road spacing was specified in opening the wilderness to farming, many, many more residents filled the rural communities and they needed all of that road maintenance done. However, given the giant size of farms in the tens of thousands of acres, instead of hundreds or less, so many of those rural roads should reasonably ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Use Native Wisdom to Protect Water

Within Native American Ojibwe and other Native cultures, we have some very knowledgeable Native women that have special responsibilities to help protect and teach about the water. We have a wonderful group of powerful Native women leaders here in Minnesota that share these water teachings, songs, and prayers. This knowledge has been passed down for centuries. Not all Native people have this knowledge. Some women from ...more »

Submitted by (@margiedespain)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Create a business incubator for large-scale pollution prevention.

We need a business incubator focused on pollution prevention. It is easy to find growth opportunities for treating more, and more polluted water. How about creating economic value and business oporrunity for avoiding the need to clean and treat water

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Develop business model for water quality protection.

It s easy to build a business that ignores water quality, or pollutes water, but we need to develop profitable ways to protect water quality. Businesses who specialize in pollution prevention could be highlighterd, promoted, given contracting priorities or incentives and make more money.

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Penalizing herbicide applicators

Herbicide applicators have a free pass to damage the waters of this state. When spraying they never turn off the spray when going over grass strips. Most if not all grass strips in this state are destroyed by senseless carelessness. There should be a $10,000 fine to any applicator destroying waterway grass strips.

Submitted by (@markhayes)

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Campaign: Water Summit

property tax bsased on non-point pollution: impaired watersheds should pay more

Tax property based on the contribution to non-point pollution. Row crops, golf courses, feedlots should pay higer taxes to offset the costs of water pollution cleanup. Start the assessment by defining impaired watersheds. Those having to pay more would be motivated to fix the problem and reduce their taxes.

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Regulation and incentives needed

Support funding and legislation to impose new regulatory mandates and incentive-based measures to improve monitoring and assessment, restoration, and protection of Minnesota’s surface waters.

Submitted by (@vedakanitz)

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Campaign: Water Summit

It's Time to Charge Heavy Water Users (Like Factory Farms) for Water

Industrial animal agriculture a/k/a factory farms have the benefit of free water in the State of Minnesota. There is a reason these large industrial-sized operations are here in Minnesota. While there is a small permit fee of $150 for factory farms that require more than 1 million gallons of water, there is no charge for the water. There are nearly 18,000 registered feedlots in Minnesota. Of those, approximately 1,219 ...more »

Submitted by (@seayrs)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Use motorboat fuel tax to fund lake protection and restoration projects

Motorboat operators buy gasoline at the pumps like car and truck drivers. The state tax paid by motorboat operators should be fully directed to pay for lake restoration and protection projects. Otherwise, boaters end up subsidizing highway projects. The money could be used to fund a cooperative grant program with lake associations and the state of MN sharing the cost of planning and implementing projects. Wisconsin's ...more »

Submitted by (@ericolsonuwextensionlakes)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Living cover

The idea of living cover is not new but what species to use is a very short list indeed. Alfalfa is the most desirable because of the deep roots that tend to store water and shrink in dry periods, this allows water to penetrate up to 8 feet even in clay quickly until the roots swell from the water uptake. In the clay country of Wright County the constant corn / bean rotation has resulted in extreme erosion and hard ...more »

Submitted by (@markhayes)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Wetlands for Carbon Credits

Wetlands have an almost unlimited potential to store carbon...more than ag and forestry combined. (UMN Nader). So why not pay as a society for our carbon sins and restore our wetlands? Drained Ag wetlands and lakes in particular. A win-win for the farmer who would get paid for carbon credits and a win for the ducks and other critters who used to live in the corn desert. And it is possible through mapping to measure ...more »

Submitted by (@bhuberty)

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