Water Summit

The summit will focus public attention on the serious challenges facing Minnesota’s water supplies – in both rural and urban areas of the state – and continue statewide dialogue around steps that must be taken to address those challenges. It will bring together water quality experts, farmers, legislators, regulators, the business community, members of the public, local leaders, and a wide variety of other stakeholders.

Water Summit

Invest in a network of action collaboratives that also function as incubators for water solutions

Invest in a statewide network of local research-engagement-action collaboratives that bring together academic and public researchers, educators and public engagement professionals, cultural and community organizers, and those who can implement or act on solutions. Encourage these collaboratives to innovate solutions by developing 'incubator' programs that encourage relationship-building, data and knowledge-sharing, learning, ...more »

Submitted by (@shanai)

Voting

3 Likes
Contribute

Water Summit

Aquatic Invasive Species

The spread of AIS through our lakes and rivers has a devastating impact on natural aquatic life. Stopping it will require behavioral changes and adequate penalties for offenders. Infested waters need ongoing research and the best available technology to clean them up. In this session, we will define what is currently being done to address the aquatic invasive species issues and ask for participants suggestions for moving ...more »

Submitted by (@erik.dahl)

Voting

7 Likes
Contribute

Water Summit

Stop wasting rainwater

Heavy rains are a problem. They run off pavements, get poisoned, are funneled into storm sewers, and have to be managed. In the country they run off depleted soils, damage bridges and roads, and create floods. Some solutions have already been proposed. This overview emphasizes education, changing building codes and regulations, and removing financial barriers. Homes: Encourage homeowners to use rain water – watering ...more »

Submitted by (@shodo0)

Voting

2 Likes
Contribute

Water Summit

Support Funding for Watershed-Based Planning by Local Governments

The Governor and Legislature have set a goal of achieving comprehensive watershed-based local water management plans (often referred to as the "One Watershed, One Plan" initiative) statewide by 2025. Funding to begin the initiative has been provided, but to achieve the goal set by the Governor and the Legislature, state funding should be continue to be provided beyond the current biennium and throughout the period required ...more »

Submitted by (@ditjc9999)

Voting

16 Likes
Contribute

Water Summit

Bentonite Clay Powder for pond liners.

North Dakota has swelling clay that may be perfect lining material for expansive water holding ponds. And, maybe those water experts at UMN can say where Minnesota local materials could reasonably be substituted for that. Impervious liners would prevent feedlots and tiled field runoff from filtering down to drinking waters below them.

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

Voting

1 Like
Contribute

Water Summit

Ensure Minnesota is Resilient to Extreme Weather

Here is the facts from a Hydrologist. When land is developed from pristine to industrial, the runoff increases by a factor of 4 according to the SCS method, Now, take land that is riddled with igneous or metamorphic outcrops and the "good" land is developed it is possible for a watershed in Duluth to hit near 98% of all precipitation to be runoff. Therefore, the trick is to capture the water and keep it where it fell ...more »

Submitted by (@markhayes)

Voting

5 Likes
Contribute

Water Summit

New School Curriculum- Understanding the Environment

Help students understand the consequences, both good and bad, of how we live, work, and play, and our impact on the environment. We not only have to fix our environmental problems, but we also have to teach people to make different choices. As I look around, kids know all about recycling, but they seem to know nothing about saving water, reducing the waste stream, and minimizing their carbon footprint. Education is the ...more »

Submitted by (@lovemywildlife)

Voting

17 Likes
Contribute

Water Summit

Connected Water Safety Monitoring Devices

Hotter waters and growing populations conspire to produce deadly illnesses in our shallow lakes and streams. The state can't afford someone to go out, sample, and test for pathogens everywhere it's possible to find them. Yet the public has a right to know and be warned, if they don't. Automated biological sensors should be installed in those areas of circulation, so as to gather constant streams of data about what's in ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

Voting

1 Like
Contribute

Water Summit

Protecting Lakes

-Motor size restrictions on small lakes It took my neighbors less than 2 years to bring down a 60 yr old oak tree, by running their speed boat too close to shore while tubing with their kids on too small of a lake. -Larger "no wake" buffers from shorelines (at least 500ft) -Larger lots, larger setbacks (no wonder Mille Lacs is dying). -vegetative buffers along the shore, and that also restrict chemical use. -All new home ...more »

Submitted by (@lovemywildlife)

Voting

12 Likes
Contribute

Water Summit

Soil Regeneration

We have been farming using Regenerative Management to grow our soils for a couple decades now. By recycling active Carbon and other nutrients back into the soil we have not only cured erosion and other environmental problems coming from our soils we have doubled the depth of our A Horizon top soils. In 2010 our place received 13 inches of rain during the flood event that nearly destroyed Zumbro Falls. We have demonstrated ...more »

Submitted by (@somgenerators)

Voting

15 Likes
Contribute

Water Summit

Irrigation-Users' Groundwater Quality Reports Via Satellite

Tracking progress on farm contributions to groundwater table contamination, and their seasonal sways, should be monitored through wifi or satellite connected pump and valve sensors. And that raw data should be transmitted along with the same from tile and pond water recycling efforts, to a Minnesota state compilation site for ongoing analysis and comparisons. Licensed wellheads and inspected monitoring systems would encourage ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

Voting

1 Like
Contribute

Water Summit

More Continuous Living Cover on Farmland

Gov. Dayton should set an ambitious goal of 20% more living cover on the land by 2020 and direct state resources to help farmers utilize more cover crops and more perennial crops. Most farmland is without plant cover most of the year, leaving the land vulnerable to soil erosion and runoff for eight months every year. Corn and soybeans make up 75% of Minnesota farmland and cover the soil for only 110 days of the year. ...more »

Submitted by (@bobbyking)

Voting

58 Likes
Contribute