Water Summit

The summit will focus public attention on the serious challenges facing Minnesota’s water supplies – in both rural and urban areas of the state – and continue statewide dialogue around steps that must be taken to address those challenges. It will bring together water quality experts, farmers, legislators, regulators, the business community, members of the public, local leaders, and a wide variety of other stakeholders.

Water Summit

Race 2 Reduce-Engaging Youth

Race 2 Reduce is a collaborative program with White Bear Lake Area Schools, Mahtomedi Schools, H2O for Life and the communities of White Bear Lake, Mahtomedi and many additional community partners. Our goal is to educate youth about water resources and introduce stategies to reduce personal water use community wide. Using water wisely is essential-and YOUTH will be a catalyst for change. We invite all communities and ...more »

Submitted by (@phall0)

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Delta Dawn

Our share of responsibility for the Mississippi Delta "Dead Zone" may not be the largest, but as Americans we share in the sorrowful death of jobs, industry, and food lost in this mistake. But there's hope. Water is diverted to the Intercoastal Waterway via a shipping canal, and that barrier chain runs to Texas. Clean water to the Southwest is a real issue, and NASA expects it's getting worse in years to come. Algal ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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complete statewide geologic and hydrologic mapping

Understanding the geology, stratigraphy and hydrology is critical to managing our water resources. We only have County Geologic Atlas on 1/3 of our counties; we need more. Understanding the recharge rates, contamination risk and depletion are the foundation of water management and we need good maps.

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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University of Minnesota Extension Educators for Water Quality

The University of Minnesota currently has Extension Educators for Water Quality in a limited number of locations. Extension Educators should be deployed in all parts of the state to connect University research with local outreach and education. This should be at State expense, not at the expense of local government.

Submitted by (@jill.trescott)

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Who Watches the Watchers?

The counties administer Chapter 7080, the septic code. However, there is no oversight. The professionals fear retribution should they turn their county in for obvious and blatant violations. The result is that the counties do as they want. They decide what they "feel" like enforcing. They rarely do enforcement because of the paperwork. They do not file the proper paperwork when they are on the site or worse they ...more »

Submitted by (@markhayes)

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Gas our way forward.

Dr. Roger Ruan of UMN's College of Biological Sciences has a raft of ways for municipalities to convert sewage wastewaters to fuels. Local treatment plants should employ workers outstate for this processing and local use. Met Council transit should run all public vehicles on these products too. But this wise move is easily ignored for fiscal temptations in times of cheap oil. (Remember, it's only cheap until they run ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Endocrine Disruptors in our Surface Water

Whereas there has been increasing concern and research being conducted on emerging contaminants found in our surface waters by the Environmental Protection Agency, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency and the U.S. Geological Survey, and Whereas these contaminants include endocrine disruptors and chemical mixtures with proven risk factors for aquatic species but an unknown risk factor for humans, and Whereas some of those ...more »

Submitted by (@pershirl)

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Connected Water Safety Monitoring Devices

Hotter waters and growing populations conspire to produce deadly illnesses in our shallow lakes and streams. The state can't afford someone to go out, sample, and test for pathogens everywhere it's possible to find them. Yet the public has a right to know and be warned, if they don't. Automated biological sensors should be installed in those areas of circulation, so as to gather constant streams of data about what's in ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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LOCAL CONTROL IS NOT WORKING - TIME TO SCRAP THE DELEGATED COUNTY PROGRAM

The MPCA reports that there are nearly 18,000 registered feedlots in the State of Minnesota. The MPCA estimates that the amount of manure that is generated by livestock in Minnesota is equivalent to a human population of 50 million people. Most feedlots in Minnesota are operated under the Delegated County Program. This program handles permitting, approval and regulation of feedlots at the local level. This program ...more »

Submitted by (@seayrs)

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Post State Duty Officer number on Fishing License to report spills, leaks and fish kills

Many people in Minnesota are unfamiliar with how to report water pollution to get the most rapid response. The Minnesota Duty Officer is the central, toll-free number to report spills, leaks or fish kills. 1-800-422-0798. The Duty Officer number should be printed on all fishing licenses and in the Fishing Regulation manual.

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Environmental Funding Future

Short money for fixing our industrial legacy, building for more citizens and repairing decay, upgrading farm systems, all stem from ourselves alone. Fair and reasonable regulations of worker and environmental safety drove our industrial empire to a developing world without those cares. I mean China. We buy their products, and nobody pays their taxes here. No jobs, no money, no infrastructure. Simple. TPP would shift ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Invest in a network of action collaboratives that also function as incubators for water solutions

Invest in a statewide network of local research-engagement-action collaboratives that bring together academic and public researchers, educators and public engagement professionals, cultural and community organizers, and those who can implement or act on solutions. Encourage these collaboratives to innovate solutions by developing 'incubator' programs that encourage relationship-building, data and knowledge-sharing, learning, ...more »

Submitted by (@shanai)

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