Water Summit

The summit will focus public attention on the serious challenges facing Minnesota’s water supplies – in both rural and urban areas of the state – and continue statewide dialogue around steps that must be taken to address those challenges. It will bring together water quality experts, farmers, legislators, regulators, the business community, members of the public, local leaders, and a wide variety of other stakeholders.

Water Summit

Oil & Water - a Toxic Cocktail

Northern Minnesota's precious lake country is at risk. As you know, in June of 2015, Canadian Pipeline giant, Enbridge gained approval of a Certificate of Need (CON) from our PUC for an oil pipeline (the Sandpiper - carrying fracked oil from the Bakken) through the Mississippi Headwaters and lake country. Since then, they have applied for another permit to relocate their Line 3 (that transports tar sand oil from Alberta) ...more »

Submitted by (@jlmosner)

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conservation and water quality requirements for farm rental contracts.

A large percentage of Minnesota cropland is rented. Farmland owners should require water quality standards for farm contracts requiring farmers to reduce runoff, reduce nutrient loss and protect water quality with penalties for non-compliance. If landlords simply required Water Quality Certification lots more acres would protect our water.

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Regulations Actually Work To Clean Up Waterways (Yes, Really)

In the early 1970s, Americans were ready to make a change in how they allowed businesses to use our public waterways. After seeing a river light on fire, due to industrial pollution, people clamored for the government to regulate pipe-source pollution (from factories and wastewater plants). And guess what? It worked! Our rivers and lakes today have far less industrial pollution than they had in the 1970s. We succeeded ...more »

Submitted by (@k.zwp1)

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Water & Wastewater Infrastructure

Three Greatest challenges: entrenched bureaucracy that will not accept anything newer than 50 years old, contracted engineers that worry more about their bottom line than that of the citizens or environments (Maple Lake-Annandale-Howard Lake is a prime example), poor zoning decisions where commercial or industrial wastewater has to pushed through the entire infrastructure instead of being placed near the WWTP. Usually ...more »

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Where and How to Find the Money

1. Legacy and Lottery Funds. Twice in the past 30 years, we Minnesotans have collectively shown our love for our iconic water by approving major public revenue generation and expenditure programs for which the money comes right out of our pockets - first in approving the lottery with environmental uses for the money embedded therein and then, virtually incredibly, in approving a sales tax increase. Some of what needs ...more »

Submitted by (@johnpjames46)

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Realities of the problem....

Minnesota has some big water problems, and some real worries, but... Just look at the map: -It's 87-thousand square miles, and half are farms. -There are 5.5-million people here. -10-thousand lakes with cabins and resorts. -Over 300 towns and cities. In tight state and local budgets, government can't do much. But upgrading plans to redesign the Twin Cities water and chemical runoff, energy, and sanitation infrastructure, ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Investing in Clean Water

The investment in clean water is not so much a monetary investment as a political one. Currently 5 state agencies and roughly 5 Federal agencies have there fingers in the Minnesota water pie. The problem is that all 10 play by different rules. i can tell you from very recent and personal experience to get a state agency to move on aquifer contamination is a Herculean feat. it requires the Governor's office, a Newspaper, ...more »

Submitted by (@markhayes)

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Total Precision Agriculture for Economic and Environmental Monitoring

Total Precision Ag is a system where all the inputs (water, seed, chemicals, etc) and outputs (bushels of grain, and quality of grain, chemical and water runoff and/infiltration) is measured and mapped across the fields down to the square foot. Less than 1% of MN Farmers have been able to implement this approach due to a lack of QUALITY...not quantity...yield monitors in combines. This approach provides the farmers ...more »

Submitted by (@bhuberty)

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Solar Thermosyphon Water Transport

Solar disinfection and transportation pipes can pump needed water supplies to higher elevations. Strategically-placed passive solar pipeline heating would create a pumping action by convection, over hills and mountains, then down to a cooler shaded decline in elevation of ground or of a man-made well. With all ends below supply and destination pond levels always, the sunniest and driest states would experience drought ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Municipal and Agricultural Byproducts

Anaerobic digesters or lagoons produce a whole lot of useful products to offset installation and operation cost improvements: -Methane for natural gas energy -Ammonia for liquid fertilizer -Hydrogen Sulfide for cellulosic feedstock breakdown? -Carbon Dioxide??? YES! Quoting the US agency: "Converting captured CO2 into products such as chemicals, plastics, fuels, building materials, and other commodities is an important ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Gas our way forward.

Dr. Roger Ruan of UMN's College of Biological Sciences has a raft of ways for municipalities to convert sewage wastewaters to fuels. Local treatment plants should employ workers outstate for this processing and local use. Met Council transit should run all public vehicles on these products too. But this wise move is easily ignored for fiscal temptations in times of cheap oil. (Remember, it's only cheap until they run ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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