Water Summit

The summit will focus public attention on the serious challenges facing Minnesota’s water supplies – in both rural and urban areas of the state – and continue statewide dialogue around steps that must be taken to address those challenges. It will bring together water quality experts, farmers, legislators, regulators, the business community, members of the public, local leaders, and a wide variety of other stakeholders.

Water Summit

AIS Crisis Response

Pay immediate attention to lakes and watersheds afflicted by a new AIS, and set up and publicize a reporting mechanism so the public can report new instances and a testing mechanism for lakes and possibly streams identified as being at high risk. When a new AIS is identified, take immediate action. Two examples: Close public accesses on Lake Koronis, where starry stonewort has been found, until an adequate response ...more »

Submitted by (@johnpjames46)

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Water Summit

Minnesota at Crossroads with regard to Pipline Corridor

Minnesota is richly blessed to have highly prized water resources, whereas many areas of the country have squandered the integrity of their water resources. We are at a crossroads with regard to pipeline corridors. At this time, the Enbridge Sandpiper and Line 3 proposals are before the PUC. Clean water is of the highest and most fundamental rights of citizens. The future of our clean water resources and renowned beauty ...more »

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Water Summit

Ice fishing regulations

I have lived on lake Mille Lacs for the past 19 years. As an avid ice fisherman I have witnessed first hand the pollution left behind at the end of the ice fishing season. Minnesota regulates camp grounds the other seasons of the year but has no regulation over fish house "camp grounds" during ice fishing. Nothing to mandate garbage pick up, toilet facilities or the basic rules to regulate what's needed if your fish house ...more »

Submitted by (@shanechaput)

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More Continuous Living Cover on Farmland

Gov. Dayton should set an ambitious goal of 20% more living cover on the land by 2020 and direct state resources to help farmers utilize more cover crops and more perennial crops. Most farmland is without plant cover most of the year, leaving the land vulnerable to soil erosion and runoff for eight months every year. Corn and soybeans make up 75% of Minnesota farmland and cover the soil for only 110 days of the year. ...more »

Submitted by (@bobbyking)

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property tax bsased on non-point pollution: impaired watersheds should pay more

Tax property based on the contribution to non-point pollution. Row crops, golf courses, feedlots should pay higer taxes to offset the costs of water pollution cleanup. Start the assessment by defining impaired watersheds. Those having to pay more would be motivated to fix the problem and reduce their taxes.

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Water Summit

On-Farm Processing for Profits

Algae farming sounds nuts, but the science backs it up. Farm runoff contains the nutrients that grow pond and stream algae, and it keeps them. Funding incentives for farm ponds and ditches that collect algae, and for on-farm processes that cheaply harvest it into a coffee-like fertilizer makes sense. UMN's Brett Barney and Steve Heilmann have that science in-hand now. Clean water, on-farm fuel generation, water and pesticide ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Boat tagging with stickers to prevent infested boats from bringing AIS to uninfested lakes

With nearly 900,000 boats in MN and an ever increasing spread of AIS impacting the lakes environment (including fisheries), we lack a macro solution to identifying the biggest AIS risk. To focus on the biggest risks of Aquatic Invasive Species spreading between lakes, we need to identify those boats that travel from uninfested lakes to infested lakes. Working smarter by focusing inspections on those boats would ...more »

Submitted by (@lakesaver)

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Western Mudslide Tiles

Towns have been swallowed-up by mudslides from excess rainfall above them, in the western US. It's likely, that with condition sensors and our mid-western agricultural drain tile use, these dangerous conditions could have been prevented. If not, at least an evacuation warning signal could have been sent before the hills went unstable. Is this something for one governor to suggest to another? Municipalities up in the hills, ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Irrigators shold be required to monitor and report changes in water quality

Large scale water appropriations from irrigators both pump and deplete our aqifers and create focused groundwater recharge changing the water quality in the area. Quarterly groundwater monitoring for nitrates, cblorides and pestiides should be reported and thresholds should be established as permit conditions for water appropriatiins. Changing, or impaired water quality attributated to irrigation could be detected before ...more »

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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need to generate understanding of the fate of contaminates.

We need better and more widespread understanding of what happens to all the fertilizers and chemicals that we apply to the land. Farmers, golf courses and home owners are pretty good about protecting and improving their soil, crops and lawns, but there is very little eduction or training on what happens to the water that receives the chemicals

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Water Summit

Priorization vs First Come First Served

Each River Basin in the State is a unique resource requiring a unique set of solutions. There are a multitude of solutions for every problem yet all solutions do provide the bang for the buck and others do. A more concerted effort to prioritize options that achieve multiple objectives and more efficient use of public and private resources is critical to success. Currently there is a lack of coordination between LSOHC; ...more »

Submitted by (@harnackcreek)

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