Water Summit

The summit will focus public attention on the serious challenges facing Minnesota’s water supplies – in both rural and urban areas of the state – and continue statewide dialogue around steps that must be taken to address those challenges. It will bring together water quality experts, farmers, legislators, regulators, the business community, members of the public, local leaders, and a wide variety of other stakeholders.

Water Summit

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

Pigs Eye Retention Wall

'100-year' floods have been occurring in the Twin Cities, in recent years, with a striking new frequency. Washing waste and lawn chemical runoff into the system, then on to the river raw, is unacceptable. Barrier walls for Holman Field and Pigs Eye Lake should be constructed to maximum of 30-50 foot height for storm drain water treatment in the lake, and to a lesser extent to prevent inundation of the runways at the airport. ...more »

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Submitted by (@swaterw)

Protecting Drinking Water for MN Proactively With Adequate Laws

We heard in the Water Summit opening remarks that MN is second to Alaska in the US for water supply. We know that water from the Mississippi River supplies drinking water not only St. Cloud, Minneapolis, and St. Paul but millions of people beyond. Lake Superior, bordering MN and the Great Lakes beyond supply millions with drinking water. Starting here in MN we need to proactively ensure that our laws protect the drinking ...more »

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Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

Gas our way forward.

Dr. Roger Ruan of UMN's College of Biological Sciences has a raft of ways for municipalities to convert sewage wastewaters to fuels. Local treatment plants should employ workers outstate for this processing and local use. Met Council transit should run all public vehicles on these products too. But this wise move is easily ignored for fiscal temptations in times of cheap oil. (Remember, it's only cheap until they run ...more »

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Submitted by (@paul.radomski)

Stop Using Potable Water for Lawns

Our groundwater use is unsustainable. Groundwater tables around the metro are rapidly declining. Much of the use of this critical water is for aesthetics. Lawn watering accounts for up to 75 percent of the total residential use. It was estimated that in the U.S. lawn covers more than threes time as much land than that of any irrigated crop. So a simple rule for a city water conservation might be that residential lawns ...more »

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Submitted by (@markhayes)

5 to 25 acre wetlands

There needs to be a funding mechanism that is NOT DNR or BOSWR or DU. Thi funding mechanism would work best on a foundation basis with a sole purpose of restoring or creating and maintaining smaller wetlands and surrounding buffer lands for water fowl production. Regardless of what the DNR and PCA think, Wild Rice is not that hard to grow. To establish other wetland plants take minimal planning and acceptance that certain ...more »

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Submitted by (@johnpjames46)

Implement a public education and action encouragement plan for water, Minnesota's iconic asset

References to just the most iconic of MN's waters (Miss R, BWCA etc) are important, but water itself is MN's iconic asset. Gov. Dayton has wisely recognized that we are in deep trouble. Changes in human behavior clearly are required and are notoriously difficult to achieve. We need the Gov to continue his leadership on this by developing public education and action plans that encompass the entire field of problems ...more »

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Submitted by (@markhayes)

Iconic water

Not so much an idea as a comment. i find the idea of iconic waters disturbing because it implies that certain waters are iconic while others are not. i suggest taking a water map of Minnesota and then roughly draw a line over the state showing the limits of what waters flow into the Mississippi River and you will find that by area over 2/3 of the state flows into River by the time it reaches Iowa. Which means Silver ...more »

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Submitted by (@jarvistyrone)

Indoor off-grid Rainwater harvesting

Encourage homes and businesses to utilize large scale Rainwater harvesting for toilets, laundry etc.. Rainwater treated using filters and Ultraviolet purification is suitable for drinking, and bathing. A sustainable, economically feasible method which reduces nonpoint source pollution and the demand on city water supply. This is a opportunity to reinvent the water grid to meet tomorrow's challenges.

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Submitted by (@markhayes)

Water & Wastewater Infrastructure

Three Greatest challenges: entrenched bureaucracy that will not accept anything newer than 50 years old, contracted engineers that worry more about their bottom line than that of the citizens or environments (Maple Lake-Annandale-Howard Lake is a prime example), poor zoning decisions where commercial or industrial wastewater has to pushed through the entire infrastructure instead of being placed near the WWTP. Usually ...more »

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Submitted by (@swaterw)

Display Water Bodies with Curly-Leaf Pondweed on the MN DNR Infested Waters List

Curly-Leaf Pondweed is an invasive species that is spread by plant fragments according the the fact sheet http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/aquaticplants/curlyleaf_pondweed.html and yet it is not listed on the regulatory Infested Waters List for MN http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/ais/infested.html This causes problems for the ordinary citizen who wants to know about the lake they may want to fish in or purchase ...more »

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Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

Realities of the problem....

Minnesota has some big water problems, and some real worries, but... Just look at the map: -It's 87-thousand square miles, and half are farms. -There are 5.5-million people here. -10-thousand lakes with cabins and resorts. -Over 300 towns and cities. In tight state and local budgets, government can't do much. But upgrading plans to redesign the Twin Cities water and chemical runoff, energy, and sanitation infrastructure, ...more »

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