Water Summit

The summit will focus public attention on the serious challenges facing Minnesota’s water supplies – in both rural and urban areas of the state – and continue statewide dialogue around steps that must be taken to address those challenges. It will bring together water quality experts, farmers, legislators, regulators, the business community, members of the public, local leaders, and a wide variety of other stakeholders.

Water Summit

Connected Water Safety Monitoring Devices

Hotter waters and growing populations conspire to produce deadly illnesses in our shallow lakes and streams. The state can't afford someone to go out, sample, and test for pathogens everywhere it's possible to find them. Yet the public has a right to know and be warned, if they don't. Automated biological sensors should be installed in those areas of circulation, so as to gather constant streams of data about what's in ...more »

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Realities of the problem....

Minnesota has some big water problems, and some real worries, but... Just look at the map: -It's 87-thousand square miles, and half are farms. -There are 5.5-million people here. -10-thousand lakes with cabins and resorts. -Over 300 towns and cities. In tight state and local budgets, government can't do much. But upgrading plans to redesign the Twin Cities water and chemical runoff, energy, and sanitation infrastructure, ...more »

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Free UMN Extension Raingarden and Cistern Design and Advice

Retaining Twin Cities' rainwater in rock-filled cisterns, both above and below ground, and 'rain-garden' design work for flowers and native plant life, will need to be mosquito and mildew-proofed. Lawn chemical runoff can be creatively controlled, but classes on the aesthetics may need examples from British and Canadian experience. UMN resources of graduate students just may fill the gap in guiding folks to the Governor's ...more »

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Subterranean Sinkhole Safety

Constructing tunnel labyrinth for the flow-processing of raw sewage wastewater below ground within the limestone and sandstone layers under the Twin Cities is a safe way of reinforcing those layers against collapsing into sinkholes. This is a major problem in areas of changing groundwater tables, especially given the size and weight of downtown buildings and water retention pools on the surface above. Natural water ...more »

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Pigs Eye Retention Wall

'100-year' floods have been occurring in the Twin Cities, in recent years, with a striking new frequency. Washing waste and lawn chemical runoff into the system, then on to the river raw, is unacceptable. Barrier walls for Holman Field and Pigs Eye Lake should be constructed to maximum of 30-50 foot height for storm drain water treatment in the lake, and to a lesser extent to prevent inundation of the runways at the airport. ...more »

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Irrigation-Users' Groundwater Quality Reports Via Satellite

Tracking progress on farm contributions to groundwater table contamination, and their seasonal sways, should be monitored through wifi or satellite connected pump and valve sensors. And that raw data should be transmitted along with the same from tile and pond water recycling efforts, to a Minnesota state compilation site for ongoing analysis and comparisons. Licensed wellheads and inspected monitoring systems would encourage ...more »

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Zika Wetland Sprays

Health departments around Minnesota are bound to be scrambling to draft mass inoculation plans to prevent Zika infections, once the next host of opportunity becomes a mosquito that's native to our prolific breeding zone. There is no vaccine yet, so denying habitat for an endemic horror here would either mean destroying our wetlands or chemical treatment of them throughout the state. This may violate the code of environmental ...more »

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Negative Pressure Pipelines

It seems from the news reports that when pipelines break, they aren't promptly caught or the breach quickly located. A petroleum sensor line might betray a leak, and a ditch liner beneath it might drain it to a safer holding pond, but that's just not good enough. Suction-powered pipes, at below atmospheric pressure, would suck air into the pipelines instead of blowing oil and gas all over kingdom come. That's a system ...more »

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Go to the source.

Short of a Depression-Era diversion project, there's just no stopping the power of the Mississippi, down South. But up on the farm, it's different. Pesticide and herbicide reformations are the hardest science to crack, and most expensive too, and perhaps hardest to treat medically. Identifying and targeting natural flood plain zones, and constructing restrictions and drainage diversions that will forever prevent field ...more »

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NextGen Sanitation

Air traffic projections are being addressed nationally, but is subterranean traffic planned for the Metro Area's expected 3.5-million people here in the next generation? Below-ground plans for sewer and water, in the traditional view, probably don't have anything new in store. "Payday's Friday, and poop runs downhill" is the old plumber's joke. But considering the age of our current mill town expansion quilt-work, we ...more »

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Trees, Leaves, Lawns, and Lagoons

City trimming wastes are ideal for UMN Dr. Roger Ruan's microwave pyrolysis oil machinery, perhaps. But, the cities' water works' lime slurry lagoons are maybe a cheap way to make those products less acidic too? I'm not the scientist here, but it stands to reason that with all of this free stuff on-hand, injecting lime into the feedstock input or the oil vapor output, might just result in a neutral PH product line. Can ...more »

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'Xceed'is the name of a bioreactor for industrial waters.

I don't know what metals that this device can remove from site waters, or where all it may be useful. But, if it can address the 1400 cities reporting lead contamination in drinking water supplies, as does Flint, I'm in favor of it.

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