Water Summit

The summit will focus public attention on the serious challenges facing Minnesota’s water supplies – in both rural and urban areas of the state – and continue statewide dialogue around steps that must be taken to address those challenges. It will bring together water quality experts, farmers, legislators, regulators, the business community, members of the public, local leaders, and a wide variety of other stakeholders.

Water Summit

Challenges Facing Minnesota's Iconic Waters

For many Minnesotans, specific waters embody what it means to live in Minnesota. Participants in this session will identify their “iconic waters” -- whether it’s Lake Superior, the Mississippi River, or the Boundary Waters – and explore what they value about these waters, the challenges they are facing, and the actions needed to improve and protect these iconic waters into the future. Key Questions What challenges/threats ...more »

Submitted by (@erik.dahl)

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Water Summit

Ensure Minnesota is Resilient to Extreme Weather

Heavy rainfall and floods are increasing in Minnesota, threatening water quality, agriculture, transportation, health and infrastructure. Warmer temperatures and changes in rainfall amounts and intensity are also impacting water quality and supplies. We need to identify actions that can make our state more resilient to these challenges. Key Questions What are the top three vulnerability areas for Minnesota water resources ...more »

Submitted by (@erik.dahl)

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Water Summit

Aquatic Invasive Species

The spread of AIS through our lakes and rivers has a devastating impact on natural aquatic life. Stopping it will require behavioral changes and adequate penalties for offenders. Infested waters need ongoing research and the best available technology to clean them up. In this session, we will define what is currently being done to address the aquatic invasive species issues and ask for participants suggestions for moving ...more »

Submitted by (@erik.dahl)

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Water Summit

Test Reporting

Every tax payer should have access (via websites e.g.) to municipal water testing on at least a quarterly basis.

 

R. Olen

Submitted by (@olenrd)

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More Continuous Living Cover on Farmland

Gov. Dayton should set an ambitious goal of 20% more living cover on the land by 2020 and direct state resources to help farmers utilize more cover crops and more perennial crops. Most farmland is without plant cover most of the year, leaving the land vulnerable to soil erosion and runoff for eight months every year. Corn and soybeans make up 75% of Minnesota farmland and cover the soil for only 110 days of the year. ...more »

Submitted by (@bobbyking)

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Water Summit

The Economics of Cleaner Water: How Fees and Taxes Could Reduce Pollution and Generate Funds

When polluting is free and conservation costs money, it's no surprise that we see more land use pollution and less conservation on the landscape in rural areas. In an state without effective regulations to address farm runoff and widespread fertilizer pollution to our rivers and groundwater, we shouldn't be surprised to see nitrate fertilizer pollution increasing in Minnesota rivers. Conventional farm soils also hold ...more »

Submitted by (@k.zwp1)

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Water Summit

Regulations Actually Work To Clean Up Waterways (Yes, Really)

In the early 1970s, Americans were ready to make a change in how they allowed businesses to use our public waterways. After seeing a river light on fire, due to industrial pollution, people clamored for the government to regulate pipe-source pollution (from factories and wastewater plants). And guess what? It worked! Our rivers and lakes today have far less industrial pollution than they had in the 1970s. We succeeded ...more »

Submitted by (@k.zwp1)

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Spirit of Water Day in Minnesota

A proclamation by Governor Dayton that we pick one day of every year going forward as "Spirit of Water Day" in Minnesota. This would be a day of reflection and action of our most important resource which defines this state. We should ask that all communities of faith in our state take the closest observed Sabbath to the date picked to reinforce what ever is referenced to in any faith beliefs by leaders of that faith ...more »

Submitted by (@sesparlin)

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Establish a State Perennial Ethanol Standard - 50% by 2026

Today, about a third of Minnesota's corn goes exclusively to ethanol production. That's no accident - its driven by policy (Federal Renewable Fuel Standard). New technology now allows us to make ethanol from other crops, including perennial crops like native grasses that are great for water, soil health, climate and habitat. I propose that we modify our existing fuel standards to require that at least 50% of ethanol blended ...more »

Submitted by (@trussell)

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Use Native Wisdom to Protect Water

Within Native American Ojibwe and other Native cultures, we have some very knowledgeable Native women that have special responsibilities to help protect and teach about the water. We have a wonderful group of powerful Native women leaders here in Minnesota that share these water teachings, songs, and prayers. This knowledge has been passed down for centuries. Not all Native people have this knowledge. Some women from ...more »

Submitted by (@margiedespain)

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Treat me like King Corn, please!

If buffer-strip crops of native plants for cellulose ethanol and other bio-fuels were harvested with the same subsidy rate that corn ethanol receives in total, it would surely be popular. No-till, no fertilizer, no pesticides, no irrigation, no planting after the first time. How could streams, farmers, and the rest do better?

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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Reward private shore owners for preservation instead of penalizing them for "under-development"

Under the current tax code we penalize good behavior of private shore owners and give subsidies to bad actors. Good water quality is preserved around our waters by maintaining healthy shore lands. Many Minnesotans preserve undeveloped shores as a moral commitment to good water, peaceful recreation for others, and a healthy and economically sustainable environment. Under our current property tax system, the private citizens ...more »

Submitted by (@downing)

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