Campaign: Water Summit

need to generate understanding of the fate of contaminates.

We need better and more widespread understanding of what happens to all the fertilizers and chemicals that we apply to the land. Farmers, golf courses and home owners are pretty good about protecting and improving their soil, crops and lawns, but there is very little eduction or training on what happens to the water that receives the chemicals

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Irrigators shold be required to monitor and report changes in water quality

Large scale water appropriations from irrigators both pump and deplete our aqifers and create focused groundwater recharge changing the water quality in the area. Quarterly groundwater monitoring for nitrates, cblorides and pestiides should be reported and thresholds should be established as permit conditions for water appropriatiins. Changing, or impaired water quality attributated to irrigation could be detected before ...more »

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Polluter Pays place an excise tax on fertilizer and pesticides to pay costs for water treatment

Placing an excse tax on all fertilizer and pesticides based on the annual cost to install water treatment systems, drill new wells and and clean up polluted water ways will both discourage the widesprea overuse of chemicals, place the burden of the costs of pollution back on the polluter, and reduce the finiancial burden on communites and individuals who have to pay to treat water

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Tile-Pond-Tile Recycling

If tax incentives were in place to establish farm tile networks that collect nutrient-rich runoff from livestock and croplands into impervious ponds, those waters can be pumped back through the tiles to wick back and refresh those soils on dry summer days. It's a cost to chemical sales, but a boon to farmers and everyone else south to the Mississippi Delta.

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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