Campaign: Water Summit

Ensure Minnesota is Resilient to Extreme Weather

Here is the facts from a Hydrologist. When land is developed from pristine to industrial, the runoff increases by a factor of 4 according to the SCS method, Now, take land that is riddled with igneous or metamorphic outcrops and the "good" land is developed it is possible for a watershed in Duluth to hit near 98% of all precipitation to be runoff. Therefore, the trick is to capture the water and keep it where it fell ...more »

Submitted by (@markhayes)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Include Resilience to Extreme Weather in Local Planning

Local planning -- such as, water management, emergency assistance/disaster,and comprehensive planning -- should be required to consider resiliency to extreme weather events, the potential impact of such events on local infrastructure, and actions that can be taken to prevent or reduce the negative consequences of extreme weather events.

Submitted by (@ditjc9999)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Incentivize water storage planning and implementation using MN's public drainage system framework

This suggestion involves incentivizing water storage planning and implementation, at the scale of the public drainage system. In our highly drained and highly productive agricultural watersheds, Minnesota’s watershed approach will work better in the long run if we employ a strong and tailored subwatershed component. This involves using the existing drainage code (M.S. 103E), to fill a gap that currently exists. That ...more »

Submitted by (@thomps5)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Creekside Water Retention Areas for Heavy Rain Surges

We need to install water retention areas downstream from drainage ditches along the small and regional creeks where the ditch water flows into. There are currently areas along creeks which hold high water flooding perhaps one or two feet deep. These areas could be deepened closer to the bottom of the creek bed with a slight slope to allow the floodwater to flow back into the creek as the water level subsides. The excavated ...more »

Submitted by (@brianthalmann)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Keep Lake Superior superior as climate changes

Lake Superior represents 10% of the Earth's surface freshwater and is important for shipping, fishing and tourism as well as many other services. Its water budget is poorly understood so we can't make accurate forecasts what will happen to it as climate changes. Increases or decreases in lake level could have huge implications for Minnesota's economy and environment. We need to bring Minnesota's science community together ...more »

Submitted by (@downing)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Wetlands for Carbon Credits

Wetlands have an almost unlimited potential to store carbon...more than ag and forestry combined. (UMN Nader). So why not pay as a society for our carbon sins and restore our wetlands? Drained Ag wetlands and lakes in particular. A win-win for the farmer who would get paid for carbon credits and a win for the ducks and other critters who used to live in the corn desert. And it is possible through mapping to measure ...more »

Submitted by (@bhuberty)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Managed Drainage/Conservation Drainage

We need to realize that dealing with water quantity impacts on our surface water in new and innovative ways on our agricultural landscape is one way we can reduce peak flows. The future use of tile to transport water off farm fields needs to be done differently than in the past and it can be done. Managed drainage is a reality and has been proven to work well on certain landscapes. During drought it can even maintain ...more »

Submitted by (@sesparlin)

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Campaign: Water Summit

The Economics of Cleaner Water: How Fees and Taxes Could Reduce Pollution and Generate Funds

When polluting is free and conservation costs money, it's no surprise that we see more land use pollution and less conservation on the landscape in rural areas. In an state without effective regulations to address farm runoff and widespread fertilizer pollution to our rivers and groundwater, we shouldn't be surprised to see nitrate fertilizer pollution increasing in Minnesota rivers. Conventional farm soils also hold ...more »

Submitted by (@k.zwp1)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Ensure Minnesota is Resilient to Extreme Weather

Heavy rainfall and floods are increasing in Minnesota, threatening water quality, agriculture, transportation, health and infrastructure. Warmer temperatures and changes in rainfall amounts and intensity are also impacting water quality and supplies. We need to identify actions that can make our state more resilient to these challenges. Key Questions What are the top three vulnerability areas for Minnesota water resources ...more »

Submitted by (@erik.dahl)

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