Water Summit

How to truly battle invasive species

The way to battle to combat invasive species in lakes and rivers are to restore limnological and riverine ecosystems to a balanced near pristine state. The only reason invasive species succeed is because there is an unfilled niche in the ecosystem. Fix the hole and there is no problem. For example, what is the real problem with Mille Lacs other than the DNR? Simple, the ecosystem is damaged in the microbial realm.. ...more »

Submitted by (@markhayes)

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Iconic water

Not so much an idea as a comment. i find the idea of iconic waters disturbing because it implies that certain waters are iconic while others are not. i suggest taking a water map of Minnesota and then roughly draw a line over the state showing the limits of what waters flow into the Mississippi River and you will find that by area over 2/3 of the state flows into River by the time it reaches Iowa. Which means Silver ...more »

Submitted by (@markhayes)

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Permanently Protect the Boundary Waters & Voyageurs from Sulfide Mining

The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness and Voyageurs National Park are irreplaceable national treasures. The natural beauty and quiet wilderness character of the Boundary Waters are threatened by sulfide-ore copper mines proposed within the watershed of the Wilderness. While federal and state laws prohibit mining activities within the Wilderness and on some adjacent national forest lands, the laws are not sufficient ...more »

Submitted by (@rachel)

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Seek Funding for the Mississippi River Commensurate with the Chesapeake Bay

The drainage area for the Upper Mississippi River TMDLs done by the MPCA is among the largest in the United States. To the best of my knowledge, it is second only to that of the Chesapeake Bay. The federal government is spending tens, perhaps hundreds, of millions of dollars to address cleaning up the Chesapeake. Minnesota elected officials at all levels should seek similar federal funding for work on the Upper Mississippi ...more »

Submitted by (@randyneprash)

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Protecting Lakes

-Motor size restrictions on small lakes It took my neighbors less than 2 years to bring down a 60 yr old oak tree, by running their speed boat too close to shore while tubing with their kids on too small of a lake. -Larger "no wake" buffers from shorelines (at least 500ft) -Larger lots, larger setbacks (no wonder Mille Lacs is dying). -vegetative buffers along the shore, and that also restrict chemical use. -All new home ...more »

Submitted by (@lovemywildlife)

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Implement a public education and action encouragement plan for water, Minnesota's iconic asset

References to just the most iconic of MN's waters (Miss R, BWCA etc) are important, but water itself is MN's iconic asset. Gov. Dayton has wisely recognized that we are in deep trouble. Changes in human behavior clearly are required and are notoriously difficult to achieve. We need the Gov to continue his leadership on this by developing public education and action plans that encompass the entire field of problems ...more »

Submitted by (@johnpjames46)

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Area of Critical Concern

WHEREAS, the Mississippi River and downstream portions of its tributaries south of the Twin Cities area are managed by a fragmented collection of local, county, state, and federal authorities; and, WHEREAS, these authorities do not provide consistent, coordinated protection and management of the river system's cultural, economic and ecological resources; and, WHEREAS, the river's communities and ecosystems urgently need ...more »

Submitted by (@vedakanitz)

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Keep Lake Superior superior as climate changes

Lake Superior represents 10% of the Earth's surface freshwater and is important for shipping, fishing and tourism as well as many other services. Its water budget is poorly understood so we can't make accurate forecasts what will happen to it as climate changes. Increases or decreases in lake level could have huge implications for Minnesota's economy and environment. We need to bring Minnesota's science community together ...more »

Submitted by (@downing)

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Great Lakes

The Great Lakes hold 20% of the planets available freshwater. This is a global strategic resource that must be protected and maintained. Minnesota is at the head of the Great Lakes Basin. So how do we do our part to protect this important resource? The harsh climate and landscape has already protected Lake Superior to some degree but all additional developments on all sectors...mining, urban development, transportation, ...more »

Submitted by (@bhuberty)

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Love Water Not Oil

Let’s protect Minnesota’s remaining pristine water from massive big oil projects. The Enbridge Sandpiper and Line 3 Replacement oil pipelines through a major new corridor pose a threat to the iconic headwaters of the Mississippi river, wetlands, forests, and trout streams. Support transfer of control of the Environmental Impact Statement to the environmental agencies, give tribes a seat at the table, work with federal ...more »

Submitted by (@kholl0)

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Say "No" to the Waukesha Diversion

We must protect Lake Superior and Great Lakes basin through a “no” vote from Governor Dayton on the Waukesha, WI diversion request. Just as Minnesotans have a collective responsibility to Minnesota’s water, all Great Lakes states, including Minnesota, have a collective responsibility to manage and protect the waters of the Great Lakes. Through the Great Lakes Compact, all eight Great Lakes States and two Canadian Provinces ...more »

Submitted by (@lsegroves)

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Use Native Wisdom to Protect Water

Within Native American Ojibwe and other Native cultures, we have some very knowledgeable Native women that have special responsibilities to help protect and teach about the water. We have a wonderful group of powerful Native women leaders here in Minnesota that share these water teachings, songs, and prayers. This knowledge has been passed down for centuries. Not all Native people have this knowledge. Some women from ...more »

Submitted by (@margiedespain)

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