Campaign: Water Summit

Reimburse Owners of Private and Public Wells for Water Treatment to Remove Agricultural Contaminants

Many non-agricultural water users must pay to treat drinking water that has been contaminated by agricultural fertilizer or pesticides. MDA estimates that, when the Township Testing program is complete, about 200 townships in the state will exceed the threshold of 5% or more private drinking water wells that do not meet MDH drinking water standards for nitrate. In some communities, more than half the private wells exceed ...more »

Submitted by (@jill.trescott)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Irrigators shold be required to monitor and report changes in water quality

Large scale water appropriations from irrigators both pump and deplete our aqifers and create focused groundwater recharge changing the water quality in the area. Quarterly groundwater monitoring for nitrates, cblorides and pestiides should be reported and thresholds should be established as permit conditions for water appropriatiins. Changing, or impaired water quality attributated to irrigation could be detected before ...more »

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Campaign: Water Summit

Polluter Pays place an excise tax on fertilizer and pesticides to pay costs for water treatment

Placing an excse tax on all fertilizer and pesticides based on the annual cost to install water treatment systems, drill new wells and and clean up polluted water ways will both discourage the widesprea overuse of chemicals, place the burden of the costs of pollution back on the polluter, and reduce the finiancial burden on communites and individuals who have to pay to treat water

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Campaign: Water Summit

The Economics of Cleaner Water: How Fees and Taxes Could Reduce Pollution and Generate Funds

When polluting is free and conservation costs money, it's no surprise that we see more land use pollution and less conservation on the landscape in rural areas. In an state without effective regulations to address farm runoff and widespread fertilizer pollution to our rivers and groundwater, we shouldn't be surprised to see nitrate fertilizer pollution increasing in Minnesota rivers. Conventional farm soils also hold ...more »

Submitted by (@k.zwp1)

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