Water Summit

Investing in Clean Water

The investment in clean water is not so much a monetary investment as a political one. Currently 5 state agencies and roughly 5 Federal agencies have there fingers in the Minnesota water pie. The problem is that all 10 play by different rules. i can tell you from very recent and personal experience to get a state agency to move on aquifer contamination is a Herculean feat. it requires the Governor's office, a Newspaper, ...more »

Submitted by (@markhayes)

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Rural Stormwater Fees Create Accountability, More Conservation

One of the few nonpoint (land use) pollution success stories in Minnesota comes form our larger cities (5,000+). These cities are treated like a point source for pollution and need to get a permit to discharge stormwater into area rivers. This process has spurred cities to do stormwater education with their residents and implement practices to hold and clean stormwater before releasing it to public waters. Most large ...more »

Submitted by (@k.zwp1)

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Permanently Protect the Boundary Waters & Voyageurs from Sulfide Mining

The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness and Voyageurs National Park are irreplaceable national treasures. The natural beauty and quiet wilderness character of the Boundary Waters are threatened by sulfide-ore copper mines proposed within the watershed of the Wilderness. While federal and state laws prohibit mining activities within the Wilderness and on some adjacent national forest lands, the laws are not sufficient ...more »

Submitted by (@rachel)

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Indoor off-grid Rainwater harvesting

Encourage homes and businesses to utilize large scale Rainwater harvesting for toilets, laundry etc.. Rainwater treated using filters and Ultraviolet purification is suitable for drinking, and bathing. A sustainable, economically feasible method which reduces nonpoint source pollution and the demand on city water supply. This is a opportunity to reinvent the water grid to meet tomorrow's challenges.

Submitted by (@jarvistyrone)

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Ban aerial application of all pesticides labeled as "severely toxic" to aquatic organisms

Many restricted use pesticides, especially fungicides and insecticides, are labeled as "severely toxic" to aquatic organisms. Many are applied by aircraft and are subject to drift and runoff. Some are applied during the middle of the growing season when intense rainfall and runoff into streams, rivers and lakes creating the risk of fish kills. The aerial application of these pesticides should be banned in Minnesota. ...more »

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Create a business incubator for large-scale pollution prevention.

We need a business incubator focused on pollution prevention. It is easy to find growth opportunities for treating more, and more polluted water. How about creating economic value and business oporrunity for avoiding the need to clean and treat water

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Irrigators shold be required to monitor and report changes in water quality

Large scale water appropriations from irrigators both pump and deplete our aqifers and create focused groundwater recharge changing the water quality in the area. Quarterly groundwater monitoring for nitrates, cblorides and pestiides should be reported and thresholds should be established as permit conditions for water appropriatiins. Changing, or impaired water quality attributated to irrigation could be detected before ...more »

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Managed Drainage/Conservation Drainage

We need to realize that dealing with water quantity impacts on our surface water in new and innovative ways on our agricultural landscape is one way we can reduce peak flows. The future use of tile to transport water off farm fields needs to be done differently than in the past and it can be done. Managed drainage is a reality and has been proven to work well on certain landscapes. During drought it can even maintain ...more »

Submitted by (@sesparlin)

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Polluter Pays place an excise tax on fertilizer and pesticides to pay costs for water treatment

Placing an excse tax on all fertilizer and pesticides based on the annual cost to install water treatment systems, drill new wells and and clean up polluted water ways will both discourage the widesprea overuse of chemicals, place the burden of the costs of pollution back on the polluter, and reduce the finiancial burden on communites and individuals who have to pay to treat water

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Require farmers selling corn to ethanol plants to be certified for Water Qualit Protection

The Minnesota Agricultural Water Quality Certification Program is voluntary and requires some of the Best Management Practices to protect our water. If ethanol producers, who consume about 30% of our corn, required MAWQC to sell corn for ethanol the industry, and the farmers would show a real committment to rural water quality.

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Regulations Actually Work To Clean Up Waterways (Yes, Really)

In the early 1970s, Americans were ready to make a change in how they allowed businesses to use our public waterways. After seeing a river light on fire, due to industrial pollution, people clamored for the government to regulate pipe-source pollution (from factories and wastewater plants). And guess what? It worked! Our rivers and lakes today have far less industrial pollution than they had in the 1970s. We succeeded ...more »

Submitted by (@k.zwp1)

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The Economics of Cleaner Water: How Fees and Taxes Could Reduce Pollution and Generate Funds

When polluting is free and conservation costs money, it's no surprise that we see more land use pollution and less conservation on the landscape in rural areas. In an state without effective regulations to address farm runoff and widespread fertilizer pollution to our rivers and groundwater, we shouldn't be surprised to see nitrate fertilizer pollution increasing in Minnesota rivers. Conventional farm soils also hold ...more »

Submitted by (@k.zwp1)

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