Water Summit

Change agriculture - an overview

The biggest water problem is the way Americans do agriculture. Giant corporations own giant farms, which are farmed with extensive use of irrigation water and chemicals, depleting soils, creating disease, destroying pollinators such as bees and butterflies. Subsidies, regulations, and tax structures encourage them. Solution: Support transition to crops requiring less water and fewer chemicals. Increase support for cover ...more »

Submitted by (@shodo0)

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Empower those doing the work

Too often there are laws on the books in MN that are not enforced. With different personalities at all levels of government, leadership seems to enforce laws differently and we hear from state employees that they are not allowed to enforce the rules on the books. Empower those doing the work to enforce the law. Do not let politics get in the way of doing what is right. Please direct the Commissioners to enforce the ...more »

Submitted by (@pfurshong)

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Water Summit

Regulations Actually Work To Clean Up Waterways (Yes, Really)

In the early 1970s, Americans were ready to make a change in how they allowed businesses to use our public waterways. After seeing a river light on fire, due to industrial pollution, people clamored for the government to regulate pipe-source pollution (from factories and wastewater plants). And guess what? It worked! Our rivers and lakes today have far less industrial pollution than they had in the 1970s. We succeeded ...more »

Submitted by (@k.zwp1)

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Water Summit

The Economics of Cleaner Water: How Fees and Taxes Could Reduce Pollution and Generate Funds

When polluting is free and conservation costs money, it's no surprise that we see more land use pollution and less conservation on the landscape in rural areas. In an state without effective regulations to address farm runoff and widespread fertilizer pollution to our rivers and groundwater, we shouldn't be surprised to see nitrate fertilizer pollution increasing in Minnesota rivers. Conventional farm soils also hold ...more »

Submitted by (@k.zwp1)

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