Water Summit

Rural Stormwater Fees Create Accountability, More Conservation

One of the few nonpoint (land use) pollution success stories in Minnesota comes form our larger cities (5,000+). These cities are treated like a point source for pollution and need to get a permit to discharge stormwater into area rivers. This process has spurred cities to do stormwater education with their residents and implement practices to hold and clean stormwater before releasing it to public waters. Most large ...more »

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Life Cycle Financing as a Condition of Water Infratstructure Funds

GovernorDayton has wisely recommended funding to modernize the aging water systems. To enhance and protect this investment, the distribution of these funds should require organizations receiving the funds to adopt a water pricing structure that is based on operating, maintenance, and ultimate replacement of costs for the system funded. Such a requirement will promote conservation of water use and provide for necessary ...more »

Submitted by (@ditjc9999)

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Seek Funding for the Mississippi River Commensurate with the Chesapeake Bay

The drainage area for the Upper Mississippi River TMDLs done by the MPCA is among the largest in the United States. To the best of my knowledge, it is second only to that of the Chesapeake Bay. The federal government is spending tens, perhaps hundreds, of millions of dollars to address cleaning up the Chesapeake. Minnesota elected officials at all levels should seek similar federal funding for work on the Upper Mississippi ...more »

Submitted by (@randyneprash)

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Quantify the Public Investments and Additional Needs for Urban Stormwater

As we do for many other types of public infrastructure, we need to quantify the existing public investment in urban stormwater infrastructure. The next steps will be to quantify the remaining needs in this area, followed by telling the story of the good work that MS4 stormwater permittees are doing to address urban stormwater and water quality. The Governor and the MPCA should support a project to do this work proposed ...more »

Submitted by (@randyneprash)

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Form the Minnesota Stormwater Research Council

Please see my earlier comment about the need for more research for urban stormwater. To address this need, the Governor should support the formation of the Minnesota Stormwater Research Council.

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Address PAH Contamination in Stormwater Pond Sediment

We have a serious legacy problem with stormwater pond sediment that is contaminated with a family of chemicals called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The cities and private landowners responsible for these stormwater ponds need help from the State to address these PAH-contaminated pond sediments. The MPCA has done excellent work to describe and quantify the problem. More work needs to be done to find solutions ...more »

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Support Research for Urban Stormwater

Through regulations like the MS4 stormwater permits, we are requiring cities and other entities to spend significant funds and staff resources to address urban stormwater. We still have a lot to learn about what stormwater management measures and techniques are safe and effective. The State should support more research for urban stormwater so that regulated parties can have enough good information to decide what implementation ...more »

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Trees are Green Infrastructure

Trees are important. They are beautiful. They provide oxygen, shade and homes for wildlife. They sequester carbon, purify our air, create a sense of community, make us safer and increase the value of our properties. They are also an integral part of our communities' green infrastructure and a large percentage of them are about to be killed by an invasive pest, the emerald ash borer. An 18" diameter tree will intercept ...more »

Submitted by (@karenz)

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Regulations Actually Work To Clean Up Waterways (Yes, Really)

In the early 1970s, Americans were ready to make a change in how they allowed businesses to use our public waterways. After seeing a river light on fire, due to industrial pollution, people clamored for the government to regulate pipe-source pollution (from factories and wastewater plants). And guess what? It worked! Our rivers and lakes today have far less industrial pollution than they had in the 1970s. We succeeded ...more »

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