Water Summit

Water & Wastewater Infrastructure

Three Greatest challenges: entrenched bureaucracy that will not accept anything newer than 50 years old, contracted engineers that worry more about their bottom line than that of the citizens or environments (Maple Lake-Annandale-Howard Lake is a prime example), poor zoning decisions where commercial or industrial wastewater has to pushed through the entire infrastructure instead of being placed near the WWTP. Usually ...more »

Submitted by (@markhayes)

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Combined Sewer Systems, better than Separate Sewer Systems, for environment.

Most older cities have combined sewer systems, where stormwater is treated in sewage treatment plants. During heavy rainstorms the systems have overflows, called CSO's (Combined Sewer Overflows) where heavely diluted sewage is discharged into open waters. Although such systems are condemned in the US, in The Netherlands they are actually favored over separated systems, as most of the polluted stormwater is treated, while ...more »

Submitted by (@petermaier)

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Life Cycle Financing as a Condition of Water Infratstructure Funds

GovernorDayton has wisely recommended funding to modernize the aging water systems. To enhance and protect this investment, the distribution of these funds should require organizations receiving the funds to adopt a water pricing structure that is based on operating, maintenance, and ultimate replacement of costs for the system funded. Such a requirement will promote conservation of water use and provide for necessary ...more »

Submitted by (@ditjc9999)

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Incentivize water storage planning and implementation using MN's public drainage system framework

This suggestion involves incentivizing water storage planning and implementation, at the scale of the public drainage system. In our highly drained and highly productive agricultural watersheds, Minnesota’s watershed approach will work better in the long run if we employ a strong and tailored subwatershed component. This involves using the existing drainage code (M.S. 103E), to fill a gap that currently exists. That ...more »

Submitted by (@thomps5)

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Encourage Actions to Better Handle Runoff in Urban and Rural Areas

Runoff is a huge problem for water quality. It includes routine runoff carrying urban and rural pollutants and the growing problem of major rain events. Because there are both urban and rural aspects to this, so practically all of us are part of the problem, we all need to be part of the solution. Solutions could reduce pollutants affecting the water, improve soil retention and quality and help recharge aquifers. ...more »

Submitted by (@johnpjames46)

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Property taxes

Landowners with wetlands on their lands should be given tax credits. It is unfair for all landowners to get taxed at the same rate when the land has varying functions and values.

Submitted by (@bhuberty)

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Soil Regeneration

We have been farming using Regenerative Management to grow our soils for a couple decades now. By recycling active Carbon and other nutrients back into the soil we have not only cured erosion and other environmental problems coming from our soils we have doubled the depth of our A Horizon top soils. In 2010 our place received 13 inches of rain during the flood event that nearly destroyed Zumbro Falls. We have demonstrated ...more »

Submitted by (@somgenerators)

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Consumer and Small Business Filtration Subsidies

Due to the size of our water treatment infrastructure needs, in the short term, particularly in certain areas, consumers and small businesses will bear the cost of filtration at the point of use. Tax credits or subsidies could help address this.

Submitted by (@mahaase)

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complete statewide geologic and hydrologic mapping

Understanding the geology, stratigraphy and hydrology is critical to managing our water resources. We only have County Geologic Atlas on 1/3 of our counties; we need more. Understanding the recharge rates, contamination risk and depletion are the foundation of water management and we need good maps.

Submitted by (@jeffreysbroberg)

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Fix septic systems across the state

Failed and inefficient septic systems are a major source of water pollution in Minnesota. Inspection and upgrading is normally only required when property changes hands. Because they impact public waters, they should be inspected regularly and upgraded as needed. Septic system inspection should be mandatory and regular - not only when they are bought or sold.

Submitted by (@downing)

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Priorization vs First Come First Served

Each River Basin in the State is a unique resource requiring a unique set of solutions. There are a multitude of solutions for every problem yet all solutions do provide the bang for the buck and others do. A more concerted effort to prioritize options that achieve multiple objectives and more efficient use of public and private resources is critical to success. Currently there is a lack of coordination between LSOHC; ...more »

Submitted by (@harnackcreek)

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Green Carpet Treatment

Lakeshore property prices are high, and never falling. But "Weekend Warriors" pay high taxes to enjoy what surrounding communities can't. And, those rural neighbors can't afford to clean-up the green slime in summer that kills fish and spreads disease. Employment there would be a big selling point to voters, though largely affecting lake home owners. And, constructing modern plumbing systems which are winter-hardy and ...more »

Submitted by (@gregory.clifford)

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